We connect people with plants and each other

In Garden to Connect, we make the urban landscape greener and bring people closer to each nature and each other. Urban gardens are often expensive and resource intensive when using plant containers of steel, concrete or terracotta. Reusing plastic building waste saves money and resources. By upcycling discarded products, production of new plant containers are avoided, which helps to mitigate climate change.

Garden to Connect selected by the European Commission

The Festival of the New European Bauhaus is the new flagship event of the European Commission, aiming to bring together talents and ideas from all over Europe, which contribute to the accomplishment of the European Green Deal.

The Garden to Connect project was selected to become part of the mobile exhibition, situated in four central squares of Brussels. Thanks to everyone who showed up!

"If the European Green Deal has a soul, then it is the New European Bauhaus which has led to an explosion of creativity across our Union."

Ursula Von der Leyen, President of the European Commission

Upcycled pipes for kitchen gardening and community building in Rwanda

Rwanda has a long tradition for urban agriculture. At the same time, the rapid urbanisation and many ongoing water infrastructure projects result in installation waste that can potentially be reused for urban farming. Together with two local NGOs, we are currently developing a pilot project that turns waste into plant containers, available for all.

First prototype installed at Indaro Center

Indaro Center in Kigali, Rwanda is a place for children who go through difficulties in life. The aim of Indaro is to bring hope and create platforms for the new generation, as well advocating and protecting children’s rights in the local community. Through Garden to Connect, the children of Indaro learn about gardening and reuse of building materials.

Garden to Connect at The People’s Festival of Nature

The People’s Festival of Nature in Denmark is an annual celebration held since 2016 of everything nature has to offer and with 20,000 attendees. The festival centers around a public debate, where politicians, scientists, organizations, and the public unite to discuss and debate on a variety of issues and topics involving nature. At the 2022 edition of the festival, the Garden to Connect project taught festivalgoers how to build your own garden with scraps of plastic waste.

Pop-up gardens invite to creativity

Aarhus Festival is one of the largest cultural events in Northern Europe. Pop-up urban gardens made from upcycled PVC pipes were displayed at the 2021 Festival. The garden invited to creative decorations by festival goers and brought a green element to the cityscape.

 
 

Medicinal plants grow in reused PVC

The beneficial effects of medicinal plants have been known for millennia. Now, users of the rehabilitation facility MarselisborgCenter in Aarhus, Denmark, and its many visitors, get the opportunity to see, touch, smell and taste some of the herbs. The scene is a small oasis in an area of ​​the center’s newly renovated park called The Immersion

Healing herbs help with rehabilitation 

The plants in the herb garden speak to all the senses: the sense of touch, the sense of smell, the sense of taste, the sense of hearing and the sense of sight. By touching and smelling a furry sage leaf, the memory can be activated, which can improve rehabilitation.

The garden is built with PVC pipe waste, which would otherwise have been sent to recycling. By reusing the pipes as plant containers, the life span of the material is extended. Sage, mint and a wide range of other medicinal herbs grow in the pipes. The climate-friendly approach to the garden fits in the overall climate vision for the renovation of the park, which in addition to being a recreational space is designed to handle increasing rainfall due to climate change.

 

 

Urban farming on the rise

In cities all over the world, city dwellers are getting into urban farming and grow crops locally on the terms of the city. The increasing share of the global population settling in urban areas is only reinforcing this trend. Urban agriculture is a natural consequence of urbanisation, which means that more and more of us live in cities. From high-tech vertical indoor growing systems in Singapore over rooftop gardens in Paris to traditional farming in Cuba, local food production will without a doubt become more and more important in the future.

Sustainable urban agriculture

Urbanisation is set to continue its rapid pace in the coming years. At the same time global population growth means there will be more mouths to feed. Usually, cities are built on prime agricultural land. This creates a potential conflict between two Sustainable Development Goals: SDG2 and its aims to end hunger, achieve food security and improve nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture, and SDG11 and its objectives of making cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable.

Urban agriculture using PVC pipes contributes to a better trade-off between the two SDGs and help meet several other Sustainable Development Goals. Hydroponics, aeroponics, vertical farming and the other urban growth systems make cities more resilient and sustainable and can support development of green spaces. At the same it enables local food production that supports nutrition security and income generation.

 

Meet the team

Marianne Mikkelsen


Marianne Mikkelsen is project leader of Garden to Connect.

Betina Ringby


Betina Ringby is project leader of Garden to Connect Rwanda.